On the eve of the 72nd anniversary of what has become known as the “Battle of Los Angeles,” West Coast Challengers thought it would be fun to create a club event around the anniversary as well as tales of some other very notable UFO sightings from around the area.

Battle of Los Angeles

What is the “Battle of Los Angeles” you ask? In the wee hours of the morning on February 25, 1942, just two months after the bombing of Pearl Harbor, Los Angeles went on full alert as radar picked up an incoming object. The entire county went to black-out conditions and when the object appeared over the skies of Los Angeles, the coastal military battery at Fort MacArthur in San Pedro, CA, opened fire — for over an hour and half — as the object seemingly hovered over Los Angeles for awhile, it then slowly headed south along the coast and out of sight. Over 14,000 rounds were fired at the UFO while it hovered silently overhead.

Battle of Los Angeles

In the morning as Los Angeles residents awoke, many found that shrapnel and .50 caliber bullets had rained down on the area and damaged more than a few homes and vehicles. Several people were also killed in the resulting chaos related to the incident. The morning edition of the LA Times showed an eerie picture with an object caught in search lights while anti-aircraft artillery exploded around it. The following day, the military claimed in was a case of war nerves and the Fort was firing on nothing. However, Secretary of War, Henry Stimpson, publicly disputed the government’s position, instead saying that it was in fact a real object of unknown origin. Later the government changed its position and claimed the object was simply a wayward “weather balloon.” Keeping in mind this was years before the Roswell UFO crash incident occurred (also claimed to be a weather balloon).

The object was never identified, but witnesses said it wasn’t planes or a barrage or weather balloon. What is was, remains a mystery today. Some think ET was paying us a visit; others think is was a lone Japanese observation plane; and the government claims it was a weather balloon. Planes don’t hover and balloons don’t withstand artillery. It is certainly one of those interesting and almost forgotten tales of Southern California.

Battle of Los Angeles

Battle of Los Angeles

Battle of Los Angeles

West Coast Challengers arranged for club members to receive a private tour of Fort MacArthur where the landmark incident occurred. Club members were treated to exploring the various underground bunkers as well as some historic military vehicles and equipment of the day.

Battle of Los Angeles

In addition, club members were treated to the history of some other very notable UFO sightings in the area, such as the UFO seen by Rex Heflin in Santa Ana, CA, in 1965. Heflin’s photographs are world renown and have yet to be debunked. Club members also learned of how the “Men in Black” made their first appearance in government conspiracy legend, which all began with the Heflin incident.

Club members were also treated to news about the recent rash of mysterious glowing orbs being seen around the southland and the west coast lately, as well as their most recent sighting that occurred this past New Years’ Eve.

… and in Auburn, Stockton and Sacramento just hours prior to the Southern California sightings:

… and meanwhile in Meford, Oregon earlier in the evening:

After visiting the Fort, the club members caravanned to lunch a short distance away, and shared stories of their own strange UFO sightings. This turned out to be a great club event that the members really enjoyed.

If you would like to learn more about the Battle of Los Angeles, the Heflin incident or the glowing orbs, you can read more about them in the hand out that club members were given to help them follow along with during the events recounting by the club President.

More pictures from the event came be found in our Club Photo Gallery.

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